SHTF blog – Modern Survival

Attention SHTFblog and Prepper Press Followers

This blog post is intended as an announcement for SHTFblog and Prepper Press email subscribers. Prepper Press has acquired (or re-acquired after many years) SHTFblog.com. For this reason, email subscribers, particularly Prepper Press subscribers, will see changes coming to how the emails look. In other words, don’t be alarmed if you see emails coming in the near future – or present – from SHTFblog instead of Prepper Press. This is not a rebranding of Prepper Press, but an expansion of our business footprint. Prepper Press will continue as a book…

Scope Mounting the Prepper Marlin 336Y

Believe it or not, not every prepper or survivalist is totally enamored with the quintessential semi-auto rifle platform.  Though the AR-15s and AK-47s among other similar rifle types are highly touted as the ideal prepper weapon, some folks just don’t like them.  Well, not like them or don’t trust them or the cartridges in their chambers. by Dr. John J. Woods, a contributing author Many alternatives from these militaristic rifle forms exist and among the most popular is the classic Marlin 336 lever action rifle.  Mainly chambered for the also…

Build a Longterm Survival Supply Bag

Some preppers and survivalists might scoff at such an idea.  After all, beyond the initial 72 or so hours of a bug out scenario, most would think you’d be surviving out of more permanent supply sources than another bag or storage box.  Well, you might be, or in some cases, you might not be.  SHTF happens.  The idea of a secondary supply bag then may not seem like such a bad or farfetched idea. By Dr. John J. Woods, a contributing author to SHTFBlog & Survival Cache Every bug out…

External Belt Gear Rigs

When the soldiers left the ships to fight in that big war to end all wars, the troops were all carrying a webbed belt around the outside of their coats or jackets. This webbed belt carried a wide variety of accessory pouches for ammo, weapons magazines, medical supplies, a canteen, maybe a holster for a 1911 Colt .45 and other optional gear items. The external webbed belt kept the gear weight well distributed around the waist and easy to access. Some web gear units even had shoulder straps. By Dr.…

Burying Guns & Ammo with MonoVault Burial Tubes

Whenever the headlines carry news of a new law that limits our 2nd Amendment rights, conversations will often come around to the subject of burying guns or creating a survival cache of some sorts.  If not firearms, people talk about burying silver and gold, ammunition, cash, important documents, even caching food storage or fuel on the path to a bug out location.  I even know of people who bury gear at their bug out location in the event it is compromised before they reach it. by Joe Nobody, author of…

Converting .223 Rifle to .300 Blackout in a Few Steps

The .300 Blackout is an effective round that bridges some of the wide gap between a .223 and a .308 as well as allowing an AR15 platform rifle to encroach on the ballistics territory of the venerable AK 47. Plus the 300 BLK has the benefit of easily going subsonic making it about as quiet as possible given the mechanical noise of operating a rifle’s action. Adding to the quiet excitement is that the difference between a traditional AR15 in .223/5.56 and one in 300 BLK is little more than a…

Prepper Pocket Pistols

The essential idea behind a pocket pistol is to carry it concealed on your person in the event of immediate need.  During an active SHTF event, a prepper-survivalists may have multiple opportunities to engage their pocket pistol for a wide variety of reasons.  It might be needed to get out of the office and home or out of the driveway to get on the road toward your Bug Out destination.  It may be needed to thwart a threat at the front door or in the parking lot. By Dr. John…

SHTF Armorer: Magazine Maintenance – Part 2

So we know to try to keep any severe damage from happening to our precious magazines – that one’s a no-brainer.  But we also need to be aware that during normal use and training, magazines get dropped onto the ground, which is the natural habitat of mud, dirt, dust, snow, small bugs, standing and/or running water, and sand.  Also, carbon and powder fouling (especially from suppressed guns), lead, copper, and brass debris from the cartridges will become denizens of the magazine just through normal use. By Drew, a contributing writer…